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Article
August 17, 1935

GASTRO-INTESTINAL PRINCIPLES: EXCEPTING THOSE HAVING ANTIANEMIC AND CIRCULATORY EFFECTS

JAMA. 1935;105(7):506-509. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.92760330002010
Abstract

Note.—  This article and the articles in the previous issues ofThe Journalare part of a series published under the auspices of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry. Other articles will appear in succeeding issues. When completed, the series will be published in book form.—Ed.

SALIVARY GLANDS  There is no evidence indicating that a hormone mechanism is significantly concerned in the secretion of saliva. Extracts of the buccal and pharyngeal mucosa fail to stimulate the salivary glands, and the introduction of dilute acid into the mouth does not stimulate the recently denervated submaxillary gland.1 Stimulation should result if a hormone mechanism is concerned.It has been shown that, following the stimulation of the peripheral end of one chorda tympani nerve, a choline-like agent appears in the blood; this results in a slight fall in blood pressure and in secretion by the salivary gland on the opposite side.

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