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Article
July 17, 1943

THE USE OF CONCENTRATED RED CELLS AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR WHOLE BLOOD: IN THE TRANSFUSION THERAPY OF ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1943;122(12):793-796. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840290013004
Abstract

It is well known that plasma is preferable to whole blood in combating the hemoconcentration of surgical shock. However, the use of the cellular portion of the blood in the transfusion therapy of anemia has not been widely discussed in this country. The present production of large amounts of plasma for war purposes leaves as a by-product the cellular portion of the blood. That it is practical to give this concentrated cellular portion without dilution in the form of multiple transfusions has been demonstrated by MacOuaide and Mollison1 and Williams and Davie2 in England. This method appears to have several advantages over the use of whole blood in the transfusion therapy of anemia. A larger amount of red cells can be given in the same total quantity, thus reducing the time and effort necessary to achieve the desired result. Patients with reduced cardiac reserve as well as anemia

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