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Article
October 5, 1935

SYMPTOMS THAT PERSIST AFTER CHOLECYSTECTOMY: THEIR NATURE AND PROBABLE SIGNIFICANCE

JAMA. 1935;105(14):1093-1098. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760400009003
Abstract

It is generally agreed that cholecystectomy, when performed on proper indications, is an extraordinarily successful procedure, as the follow-up studies of Mueller,1 Whipple,2 Maynard,3 Stanton,4 Dwyer and Dowling,5 Judd,6 Graham and Mackey7 and others have clearly shown. Permanent good results are obtained in from 80 to 95 per cent of cases in which stones are present, and in noncalculous disease of the gallbladder comparable results are obtained when the pathologic process is advanced. As all authorities agree, patients who have lesser degrees of cholecystic disease give distinctly less favorable results. If persons have suffered from definite biliary colic, the surgical results are usually good, regardless of the pathologic condition of the gallbladder. In those cases in which symptoms are less

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