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Article
October 12, 1935

IMPORTANCE OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE: HOW IT CAN BEST BE HANDLED THROUGH STATE DEPARTMENTS OF HEALTH

JAMA. 1935;105(15):1157-1161. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760410001001
Abstract

My discussion of industrial hygiene will be concerned principally with the effect of industrial environment on health. The effect of an unhealthful working environment was recognized by some of the fathers of medicine even before the beginning of the modern factory system. But the most impressive evidence of the effect of an unhealthful working environment is probably the morbidity and mortality statistics developed by Dublin in 1929 as the result of a study of three and a quarter million wage earners. Although his results have been presented before and are doubtless familiar to many, they show such a clear picture of the widespread effects of an industrial environment on the health of the worker that a few of the more significant conclusions are presented. Dublin's figures include a wide variety of industries, both those which are especially productive of occupational disease and also those which present no outstanding health hazard.

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