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Article
October 12, 1935

SHOULD HETEROPHILE ANTIBODY BE USED IN THE TREATMENT OF PNEUMOCOCCIC PNEUMONIA?

JAMA. 1935;105(15):1180-1182. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760410024007
Abstract

The investigations of Bailey and Shorb1 and of Jamieson, Powell, Bailey and Hyde2 have prompted the addition of heterophile antibody, produced in rabbits, to the usual antipneumococcus serum in the treatment of human cases of pneumococcic lobar pneumonia. The justification for the use of such a mixture and the alleged claims for the superiority of such a product may be summarized briefly: 1. In human cases of pneumonia, just as in rabbits injected with cultures, the pneumococcus is said to exhibit the properties of a heterophile antigen. 2. The patient's pneumococci and the injected horse serum (which is known to be an active heterophile antigen) are said to combine with the natural heterophile antibody and render the latter inactive with regard to its alleged protective action against invasion by the pneumococcus. 3. This antigen-antibody combination may account for the "primary toxicity" of therapeutic horse serum and the untoward

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