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Article
October 12, 1935

HEMATOGENOUS OSTEOMYELITIS AND PYARTHROSIS DUE TO SALMONELLA SUIPESTIFER

JAMA. 1935;105(15):1188-1189. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.92760410002011a
Abstract

Salmonella suipestifer, or the "hog cholera" bacillus, is usually found in association with the virus of hog cholera but has also been isolated from cattle, sheep and rodents. For several years after its identification it was considered to be nonpathogenic to man, but since 1918 numerous epidemics of gastro-enteritis have been reported in which this organism was ingested with food and was recovered from the stools of the afflicted individuals.

Gouley and Israel1 have recently reported thirty-five instances of bacteremia in man due to Bacillus suipestifer, which included thirty-four cases found in a review of the literature and one of their own. The disease, for the most part, was evidenced as a bronchopneumonia or simulated typhoid or influenza. Since only one patient in this series was reported as having a bone or joint involvement, we feel that the following case of osteomyelitis is of interest:

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