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Article
October 19, 1935

THE SO-CALLED MOSAIC FUNGUS AS AN INTERCELLULAR DEPOSIT OF CHOLESTEROL CRYSTALS

Author Affiliations

Lecturer in Dermatology and Research Worker on Dermatophytes, Respectively, University of Manitoba Faculty of Medicine WINNIPEG, MANIT.

JAMA. 1935;105(16):1262-1264. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760420032008
Abstract

When scrapings from the feet mounted by the usual method in potash are examined microscopically for the presence of ringworm fungi, two kinds of fungus-like structures are commonly observed. One kind consists of long, more or less sinuous, sparingly branched threads, which are universally recognized as true hyphae belonging to a dermatophyte (fig. 1). Attempted isolations from such material yield a high proportion of cultures. The other kind of fungus-like structure consists of irregular discrete branching threads, which follow the contours of the epithelial cells (fig. 2). It has been named "mosaic fungus" by Weidman and is still the subject of controversy, as its supposed status as a fungus has not hitherto been clearly proved or refuted. Isolations of dermatophytes have seldom been reported from material that contained only the "mosaic fungus."

Weidman,1 who in 1927 drew attention to these bodies by his original description, suggested that if

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