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November 2, 1935

THE ETIOLOGY OF HEART DISEASE: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE PRESENT STATUS OF THE PREVENTION OF HEART DISEASE

JAMA. 1935;105(18):1391-1394. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760440001001
Abstract

In the history of our knowledge of circulatory disease the nineteenth century contributed chiefly through its descriptions of structural change in the heart and blood vessels. The present century may become known as the one in which emphasis on causation led to the etiologic classification of heart disease and to the first steps in its prevention. This has proved already to have been a great advance and proceeds most decisively from the work of Cabot1 in Boston. He attributed the four common types of heart disease to rheumatism, syphilis, hypertension and arteriosclerosis, and these remain the causes of nine tenths of the organic heart disease of the United States. In the remaining one tenth are found such diverse types of heart affliction as congenital, thyroid, acute and subacute bacterial, diphtheritic and toxic heart disease, and the damage to the heart produced by pulmonic hypertension, anemia, trauma, systemic disease and

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