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November 2, 1935

CHOLECYSTIC DISEASE: A COMPARISON OF THE CLINICAL WITH THE CHOLECYSTOGRAPHIC DATA CONCERNING 500 PATIENTS NOT OPERATED ON

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Radiology, the Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Roentgenology, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1935;105(18):1416-1419. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760440026007
Abstract

The reliability of cholecystographic data when subjected to the test of operation and pathologic examination has been proved repeatedly. For example, of 4,676 patients examined by cholecystography in 1932 at the Mayo Clinic, 732 were operated on, and the cholecystographic report, whether positive or negative, was confirmed in 696 (95 per cent) of the cases. Among 287 patients whose cholecystograms were normal and who were operated on chiefly for diseases other than of the gallbladder, surgical exploration confirmed the cholecystographic diagnosis in 257 (89.5 per cent). Of 445 patients concerning whom cholecystographic data were positive, 439 (98.6 per cent) had disease of the biliary tract. Comparable statistics have been reported by many other roentgenologists, so that the trustworthiness of the method, so far as proof by operation goes, is well established and generally accepted.

Occasionally, however, the question as to patients not operated on is raised; the implication is that,

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