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November 16, 1935

PRIMARY ESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMA, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO A NONSTENOSING VARIETY: A CLINICOPATHOLOGIC STUDY BASED ON ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHT NECROPSIES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Departments of Medicine, Radiology and Pathology, Philadelphia General Hospital.

JAMA. 1935;105(20):1591-1595. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760460027006
Abstract

Recently, within a comparatively short period, autopsies revealed esophageal carcinoma in four patients who had not presented dysphagia, pain, regurgitation of food and vomiting, the characteristic symptoms. In the absence of the usual clinical picture presented by the disease, their physicians had not appreciated the presence of a new growth in the esophagus; they found some consolation for their failure in diagnosis, however, in the fact that the postmortem examination presented carcinomatous lesions which were nonstenosing and therefore did not obstruct the passage of food.

The evidence in these four cases prompted the undertaking of a clinicopathologic analysis of the Philadelphia General Hospital series of patients from 1920 to 1933. It was hoped that such a study might point the way to certain conclusions concerning the incidence of nonobstructive carcinomatous lesions in the esophagus, that distinguishing clinical evidences might be brought to light, that the relative degree of clinical and

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