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November 23, 1935

FACTORS CAUSING BRONCHIECTASISTHEIR CLINICAL APPLICATION TO DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

JAMA. 1935;105(21):1666-1670. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760470020005
Abstract

Bronchiectasis may be defined as a condition in which the bronchial tubes are dilated beyond their normal size. The pathologic process present practically always produces symptoms, the commonest being chronic cough and sputum. Most cases of bronchiectasis were diagnosed "chronic bronchitis" until 1922, when Sicard and Forestier1 discovered the usefulness of iodized oil, which was radiopaque and could readily be injected into the bronchial tree without danger, and bronchial dilatation could be diagnosed with certainty. It is since then that our knowledge of this disease has progressed markedly. Recent studies have shown more clearly the pathologic process involved in bronchiectasis. This work will be reviewed and the interpretation of signs and symptoms on this pathologic basis will be discussed, as well as the rationale of treatment.

ETIOLOGY OF ACQUIRED BRONCHIECTASIS  In a recent survey of 110 cases of bronchiectasis, which have been thoroughly studied and followed for varying periods

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