[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
November 30, 1935

THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE ALCOHOLISM: WITH TEN PER CENT CARBON DIOXIDE AND NINETY PER CENT OXYGEN INHALATION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Fifth Medical Service, Boston City Hospital, John A. Foley, M.D., Physician-in-Chief, and the Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1935;105(22):1734-1738. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760480004002
Abstract

For many years the Fifth Medical Service of the Boston City Hospital has been in charge of almost all medical alcoholic patients admitted to this hospital. It is estimated that approximately 700 alcoholic patients are admitted to this service for treatment each year. The opportunity has been present, therefore, to study alcoholism in all its phases.

The acute alcoholic patient1 generally can be given a good prognosis as to recovery. For this reason, even when medical aid is sought for him, he receives little active therapy. In the paralytic stage of acute alcoholic poisoning, however, emergency treatment may be life saving. Patients in this stage present a picture best described by Sollmann,1 who states that the symptoms are those of beginning medullary paralysis.

×