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November 30, 1935

THE REACTIONS TO THE NONSPECIFIC PROTEIN TREATMENT OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases.

JAMA. 1935;105(22):1765-1767. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.92760480008008a
Abstract

The writings about the effects of nonspecific protein treatment, therapeutic and otherwise, have been reviewed by others1 and are considered in the article by Cecil, which follows. Hence this literature will not be considered in detail here. As used in this article the term nonspecific protein refers to proteins of different antigenic and other properties than the microbes concerned in the diseases subjected to the treatment.

The usual obvious effects of the intravenous injection of foreign proteins of any kind are chill, fever, headache, and gastro-intestinal and other disturbances. These effects are dependent on and associated with humoral and cellular changes of complex nature. In its typical form the protein reaction reaches its height a few hours after the injection, and in infectious states the subsidence of the reaction may be followed by clinical improvement. The benefit seems to bear some relation to the general reaction and fever;

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