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December 7, 1935

RELATION OF LEUKEMIA OF ANIMALS TO LEUKEMIA OF MAN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital and the Departments of Pathology and Medicine, Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1935;105(23):1824-1831. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760490008003
Abstract

Many of the recent contributions to the knowledge of leukemia and related diseases have come through experimental studies in animals. This report is a review of some of these contributions and an attempt to correlate them with the human disease.

LEUKEMIA OF MICE AS A NEOPLASTIC DISEASE1  Leukemia of a mammal (guinea-pig) was first transmitted by Snyders, but most of the experimental studies that established the neoplastic nature of this disease were made with the leukemias of mice.Leukemia of mice, both lymphoid2 and myeloid,3 is transmissible to healthy individuals of the same species. Transmission is successful only with live leukemic blood cells, and the inoculum loses its ability to transmit the disease when subjected to such procedures as glycerination and desiccation in the frozen state, which injure live cells while they do not destroy viruses and micro-organisms. Cell-free extracts fail to transmit the disease.The source

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