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December 14, 1935

SUSCEPTIBILITY AND IMMUNITY: IN RELATION TO VACCINATION IN ACUTE ANTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine; Director, Research Institute of Cutaneous Medicine PHILADELPHIA

From the Research Institute of Cutaneous Medicine and the Department of Medicine of Temple University.

JAMA. 1935;105(24):1956-1963. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760500008002
Abstract

Is it worth while to attempt vaccination against acute anterior poliomyelitis in view of the low attack rate of the disease? If so, what are the prospects of success attending such efforts since the disease is evidently caused by a virus probably multiplying on or in the susceptible anterior horn cells of the spinal cord and causing the pronounced signs of disease only when coming in contact with such cells? Is it likely that anti-body produced in human beings by vaccine of spinal cords of monkeys infected with remote passage virus will protect against the disease? If this appears possible, how should the vaccine be prepared? And if it is found possible to vaccinate human beings safely and effectively against poliomyelitis with such vaccine, how should the method be applied as a practical procedure? These and additional problems of related interest are briefly discussed herewith as the basis of my

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