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December 14, 1935

THE PREVALENCE OF MILD BRUCELLA ABORTUS INFECTIONS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital.

JAMA. 1935;105(24):1976-1978. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760500028006
Abstract

In the last few years the profession has become increasingly conscious of the prevalence of undulant fever. But I do not think it has yet realized how common the subclinical and ambulatory forms may be. I hazard the opinion that many such cases may masquerade under the guise of infectious arthritis, nervous exhaustion, undiscoverable focal infection, and chronic neutropenia.

PREVALENCE  Until recent years the specific agglutination tests have been considered the sine qua non for the presence of brucella infection. It is now known that negative agglutinins may be of little significance. From 5 to 16 per cent of the cases proved by cultures, skin tests and animal inoculation give negative agglutinins, and a low titer must be seriously considered in the diagnosis.1 In addition, an astonishingly large number of persons give positive agglutinations with or without clinical symptoms. In 25 per cent of 1,000 routine Wassermann tests, low

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