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December 14, 1935

OUTBREAK OF UNDULANT FEVER DUE TO BRUCELLA SUIS

Author Affiliations

HARTFORD, CONN.

From the Bureau of Preventable Diseases, State of Connecticut Department of Health, Millard Knowlton, M.D., director.

JAMA. 1935;105(24):1978-1979. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760500030007
Abstract

An outbreak of undulant fever occurred in an institution maintained for elderly persons in Connecticut during 1934-1935. There were fourteen clinical cases with three deaths. Blood cultures from two of the fatal cases were positive for Brucella suis. This organism was also isolated in pure culture from an abscess in the soft tissue overlying the sternum of a third patient. Epidemiologic, clinical and laboratory evidence supports the view that most of the Brucella infection of man in this section is due to the bovine strain.1 This was the first outbreak reported in Connecticut due to the porcine organism.

The population of the institution consisted of 305 inmates and eighty-one employees. The case of a 13 year old boy was included because he used milk from the dairy herd maintained by the institution. Table 1 gives the population by age group and sex; table 2 gives data pertaining to each

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