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July 11, 1936

ARTIFICIAL FEVER IN THE TREATMENT OF GONORRHEAL OPHTHALMIA

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.

From the Departments of Ophthalmology and Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine and Duke Hospital.

JAMA. 1936;107(2):102-104. doi:10.1001/jama.1936.02770280012003
Abstract

Fever as a therapeutic agent was introduced in 1918 by Wagner von Jauregg,1 who reported use of malaria in the treatment of dementia paralytica. Soon, other fever producing substances were being used, such as intramuscular milk and peptone, streptococcus and typhoid-paratyphoid intravenous vaccines. With these methods the temperature is uncontrolled and generally of short duration, unless the divided dose method of intravenous typhoid-paratyphoid vaccine is employed.2

Within the past seven years the therapeutic use of accurately controlled fever produced by physical means has slowly but surely supplanted the uncontrolled methods.

Diathermy, radiothermy, air conditioned cabinets, inductothermy and radiant energy may be used. We employ the latter because of its simplicity, low cost, and relative comfort for the patient. A complete description of the cabinet is reported elsewhere.3 Briefly, it consists of a cellotex lined cabinet, heated by seven 120 watt carbon filament bulbs, which fits over a

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