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August 15, 1936

OSMOTIC EFFECT OF CALCIUM IONS IN THE BLOOD

JAMA. 1936;107(7):503-504. doi:10.1001/jama.1936.02770330033013
Abstract

The biochemical relationships of calcium have received much attention and have become reasonably well defined. The recognition of the indispensability of this element in nutrition, the discovery of the calcium-mobilizing power of the hormone of the parathyroid glands and the demonstration of the influence of vitamin D on the utilization of calcium have added impetus to the already vigorous trend of investigation of the state in which this element exists in blood and other body fluids and the manifold functions it fulfils in the organism. The total calcium concentration in the serum remains rather constant—close to 10 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters. Physiologic studies involving the variation of this value have demonstrated that the level of blood calcium constitutes one of the equilibriums on which life depends. Perhaps the clearest description of the probable physical state of this element in the serum has been given by McLean and Hastings.1

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