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September 19, 1936

DELIVERY AND CARE OF THE NEWBORN INFANT OF THE DIABETIC MOTHER

JAMA. 1936;107(12):919-924. doi:10.1001/jama.1936.02770380001001
Abstract

Priscilla White1 recently has written a most comprehensive article on the problems which arise when a diabetic woman becomes pregnant. It is not our purpose to reconsider this entire subject but rather to offer suggestions for one of its phases; namely, the delivery and care of the new-born infant.

Prior to the discovery of insulin, pregnancy for the diabetic woman was particularly dangerous. Fortunately, then, the fertility of diabetic women was low and few of them conceived; a high percentage of those who did conceive died, as did most of the infants. Since the discovery of insulin the situation has changed. Many of those who have diabetes in childhood now live to reproduce. The fertility of women who have diabetes that has been controlled is higher than was that of diabetic women before insulin was discovered; in addition, diabetes now can be better controlled during pregnancy, so that more

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