[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
November 11, 1939

DELAYED PARALYSIS OF NERVES FROM A SINGLE MUSCULAR CONTRACTION: REPORT OF FIVE CASES

JAMA. 1939;113(20):1801-1804. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800450023006
Abstract

That peripheral nerves may be rendered incapable of conduction of voluntary impulses by indirect trauma of the type known as muscular action is too well known to merit stress; but that such paralysis may result from a single muscular compression, and especially that the paralysis may appear hours to weeks after the trauma, are facts that seem to have been largely overlooked by clinicians for years. Clinical records of such cases were included by Weir Mitchell in his book,1 and Remak2 made a special point of delayed paralysis. Bernhardt3 included the syndrome in his monographic account of neuritis, and more recently Jokl and Guttmann4 reported a relatively large series of cases occurring in sportsmen.

Mitchell5 stated:

As a rule, contusions, unless violent, do not cause immediate symptoms of loss of function. A little numbness and tingling may succeed to the first shock of pain, and only

×