[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
January 20, 1940

ROLE OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT IN PRODUCTION OF CARDIAC SYMPTOMS: EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

JAMA. 1940;114(3):217-223. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810030017004
Abstract

The clinical significance of gastrointestinal disturbances in the angina pectoris syndrome and other cardiac disorders has been conceded by various authors.1 Experimental studies, however, have never to our knowledge been reported on the attempt to investigate the relationship and interdependence of the digestive tract and cardiovascular disease in the human subject, such as this report entails.

This study was first suggested to us by several observations. First, several of our patients with angina pectoris and gastrointestinal disturbances had for some time experienced indifferent results from the usual methods of management of angina pectoris, including administration of the xanthine derivatives (theophylline, theophylline with ethylene diamine) as well as glyceryl trinitrate, curtailment of activity and other measures.

On intensive therapy directed to the gastrointestinal tract much better clinical results were obtained for the first time in the diminution of the frequency and intensity of paroxysms of anginal pain. Second, great interest

×