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January 20, 1940

THE DURATION OF LIFE AFTER CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS: A STUDY OF 296 CASES IN WHICH AUTOPSIES WERE MADE

JAMA. 1940;114(3):236-237. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810030036008
Abstract

It is a common fallacy among members of the medical profession, as well as among the public, to assume that cerebrovascular accidents are responsible for a great number of so-called sudden deaths, in which the term "sudden death" is taken to mean death which occurs within two hours after the onset of symptoms. This assumption has persisted in face of the fact that no case has been reported in the literature in which death occurred within less than five minutes of the onset of symptoms.1 Spillsbury2 felt that such deaths were rarely sufficiently rapid to warrant cerebrovascular accidents being called a cause of sudden death. While coroner for Dublin, Maloney3 reported a large series of sudden deaths and in only one case did the question of cerebral hemorrhage arise; in this instance the man was found dead. In the series to be reported, persons who were found

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