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March 30, 1940

A HOSPITAL EPIDEMIC OF FLEXNER DYSENTERY CAUSED BY CONTAMINATED ICE

JAMA. 1940;114(13):1151-1154. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810130013005
Abstract

Epidemics of dysentery seemingly have always been with us. Davison,1 in his study of bacillary dysentery, traced the history of the disease from the earliest recorded times. While dysentery has commonly been called an asylum disease, it is surprising that hospital outbreaks have been relatively rare, and particularly is this true of the Flexner type. In late years the Flexner epidemic reported by Felsen and others2 from Jersey City is probably the best known. We have made a rather complete survey of the recent literature and have been unable to find more than three additional Flexner outbreaks in institutions. Block and Simon3 reported an epidemic due to either raw milk or food contaminated by carriers in a mental hospital, while Litteral and Steele3a reported two outbreaks in the same hospital in the Canal Zone.

There have been reported at least two other outbreaks of bacillary dysentery

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