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May 18, 1940

RENAL LESIONS FOLLOWING ADMINISTRATION OF HYPERTONIC SOLUTIONS OF SUCROSEREPORT OF SIX CASES

JAMA. 1940;114(20):1983-1987. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810200011002
Abstract

Intravenous administration of hypertonic solutions of sucrose has become popular within recent years for the reduction of increased intracranial pressure. Bullock, Gregersen and Kinney1 in 1935 showed that sucrose reduced cerebrospinal fluid pressure without a secondary rise, such as followed administration of dextrose or saline solutions. The usefulness of sucrose was confirmed by Masserman2 and by Jackson, Dickerson and Gunther.3 The injected sucrose did not appear to metabolize or to diffuse out into the cerebrospinal fluid. The sugar was rapidly excreted by the kidneys, with a marked diuresis amounting to about four times the amount of sucrose solution injected. Toxic effects noted were slight, although patients complained of malaise and muscle pain, and a moderate leukocytosis occurred.

Helmholz4 in 1933 noted that hypertonic solutions of sucrose given intravenously to rabbits produced marked renal lesions. One hour after a 20 per cent solution of sucrose was administered,

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