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Editorials
November 16, 1964

THE SUPPLY OF MEDICAL GRADUATES: A TIME OF RE-EVALUATION

JAMA. 1964;190(7):678-679. doi:10.1001/jama.1964.03070200114023
Abstract

In October 1959, the report of the Surgeon General's Consultant Group on Medical Education entitled Physicians for a Growing America was published by the US Public Health Service (Bane Report).1 In it an attempt was made to determine the need for medical school graduates through the year 1975. Estimates were based upon the projected growth rate of the population, the death rate in the profession, the anticipated increase of medical graduates at the existing rate, and the annual number of new foreign licentiates. The assumption was made that the physician-to-population ratio should be kept constant or nearly so.

The report concluded as follows: "To maintain the present physician-population ratio, the expected 1975 population of 235 million will require a total of 330,000 doctors of medicine and osteopathy. This would necessitate the annual graduation of 11,000 students, an increase of approximately 3,600 over the 1959 graduates." These figures included the

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