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Article
May 28, 1898

SOME SUGGESTIONS CONCERNING THE EXAMINATION AND COMMITMENT OF THE INSANE.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Nervous Diseases, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore: Consultng Neurologist to Bay View Asylum, City Hospital, Hebrew Hospital, Church Home, etc. BALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(22):1264-1265. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440740010002b

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Abstract

The commitment of an individual to an asylum is an act of serious import, and often of far-reaching consequences, and it should be attended with more care and thought than is often awarded it. There are two considerations always to be borne in mind, the first of great importance, namely, the consequences to the patient, and second, a much less important point, but nevertheless one that must be considered, the consequences to the committing physician.

In regard to the first point, there is often rather too much haste in sending patients to an asylum. I have not infrequently been called to sign a commitment for a patient in whom the mental condition was simply one of depression from over-work or over-worry, which was relieved by a trip away from home. More often still have I been asked to commit a patient with hysteria. Another class that I am frequently asked

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