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Article
May 28, 1898

ERYTHOXYLON COCA AS A HEART TONIC.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK. N. Y.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(22):1277-1278. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440740023002h

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Abstract

After the 1871, San Francisco, meeting of the American Medical Association, I went to the Yosemite Valley and ascended the Cap of Liberty, 12,500 feet above sea level. I remember the ascent, which was so steep that I had to pull myself up by the bushes! The diminished atmospheric pressure was such that I could not climb more than forty feet at a time. My pulse ran so high that I could not count it. My heart beat so violently that I felt it would stop if I did not pause, and my whole body was bathed in sweat. As my heart was somewhat enlarged and so weak that its usual beats were forty per minute, I suppose I ran an imminent risk of losing my life, but as a result I had herpes zoster. This California mountain experience helps me to understand how climbers have vertigo on the summit

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