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This Week in JAMA
December 19, 2001

This Week in JAMA

JAMA. 2001;286(23):2907. doi:10.1001/jama.286.23.2907

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed for the treatment of depression. Kroenke and colleaguesArticle compared the effectiveness of initial treatment with 3 SSRIs—paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline—in a randomized trial among patients beginning antidepressant therapy in primary care practices. During 9 months of follow-up, amelioration of depression and improvements in other psychological, functional, and health-related quality-of-life outcomes were not significantly different among the 3 treatment groups. In an editorial, SimonArticle discusses selection of first-line antidepressant medication and care after the initial prescription, noting that initial treatment with any SSRI drug will not be successful in a substantial minority of patients.

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