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Article
July 30, 1910

THE ACTION OF ALCOHOL ON THE NORMAL INTACT UNANESTHETIZED ANIMAL

JAMA. 1910;55(5):372-375. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330050010007
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  Heretofore, on account of the objectionable methods employed, so far as I know no adequate direct observations have been recorded on the action of alcohol on the general blood-pressure of the intact animal. One objectionable feature is that these methods have as a rule involved the employment of a general anesthetic, such as chloroform or ether; and it is not easy to distinguish the normal action of alcohol when administered to an animal already far under the influence of a very closely related drug of the same group. For example, how could one distinguish the normal action of alcohol on the general blood-pressure of an animal when its vasomotor reflexes were already greatly depressed by ether or chloroform? One of the means employed to avoid the use of anesthetics is to remove the cerebral hemispheres.1 But this is a poor makeshift, for an animal with its cerebral hemispheres mutilated

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