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Article
August 20, 1910

OPHTHALMIA NODOSA OR CATERPILLAR-HAIR OPHTHALMIAWITH REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Michigan DETROIT, MICH.

JAMA. 1910;55(8):639-642. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330080005003
Abstract

By ophthalmia nodosa is understood an affection of the eye caused by the entrance into the tissues of the eyeball of the hair of certain varieties of caterpillar. It was first described by Pagenstecher1 in 1883 as "caterpillar-hair ophthalmia," later by Wagenmann2 as "pseudotuberculosis," and by Saemisch as "ophthalmia nodosa." It shows a tendency to form tubercle-like structure, often showing nodules appearing singly or in crops, progressing mostly with exacerbation and remissions. The patient does not always give a history of caterpillar contact, the diagnosis being made with the aid of the microscope.

We are indebted for studies on this subject to Baas,3 Wagenmann,2 Hillemann,4 Kruger,5 Lawford,6 Stargardt,7 de Schweinitz and Shumway,8 Teutschlaender9 and others, and for an analysis of the literature to Ginsberg,10 Greeff,11 and Parsons.12

The disease is most common among those who work in

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