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Article
September 10, 1910

A CASE OF FRACTURE OF THE THYROID CARTILAGE WITH PROMPT RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

Assistant Physician, Hudson River State Hospital POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y.

JAMA. 1910;55(11):943. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330110043014
Abstract

Fractures of the larynx are generally considered grave injuries. When one considers the danger of suffocation from displacements of the fragments, or from edematous swelling, or from occlusion of the air-passages with blood-clots, one can understand why a case of this kind should not be looked on lightly. Fisher pronounced every case serious. Gurlt in 1864 collected reports of 69 cases in which 47 patients died and only 21 recovered. Eastman1 quotes Durham, who collected reports of 30 cases of fracture of the thyroid cartilage, in ten of which the patients recovered, most of them after tracheotomy. During the past few years a few cases have been reported in which the symptoms were of a mild type. The "American Practice of Surgery" states that tracheotomy is not usually necessary in the simple cases and those of vertical fracture of the thyroid, but is indicated in any fracture of the cricoid

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