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Article
November 12, 1910

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TUBERCULIDES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF TUBERCULOSIS IN INFANCY

Author Affiliations

Assistant in the Department of Pediatrics in the Post-Graduate Hospital and Medical School NEW YORK; Assistant in the Städtischen Kinderasyl in Berlin BERLIN, GERMANY

From the Städtischen Kinderasyl in Berlin; chief of clinic, Prof. H Finkelstein.

JAMA. 1910;55(20):1721-1723. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330200031009
Abstract

During the past few years it has become more and more evident that tuberculosis in infancy is by no means as rare a disease as was formerly thought. The various tuberculin reactions have aided greatly in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in infancy. A positive tuberculin reaction in infancy generally means an active tuberculous focus. But before we scarify the skin of an infant, or rub an ointment into it, or inject fluid under or into its skin, there must be some sign or symptom that would lead us to suspect tuberculosis. It is a peculiarity of infancy, however, that most of the signs and symptoms are often absent.

In a typical case of tuberculosis in infancy the following symptom-complex is present: anemia, loss in weight, elevated and irregular temperature, "bronchial gland," cough, often expiratory dyspnea (Schick), general glandular enlargement (and in this respect the enlargement of the supraclavicular and anterior axillary

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