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Article
November 26, 1910

THE RADICAL CURE OF MALARIA; ITS IMPORTANCE AND HOW IT IS ATTAINED

Author Affiliations

Professor of Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, University of Alabama; Visiting Physician, City Hospital MOBILE, ALA.

JAMA. 1910;55(22):1879-1885. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330220023010
Abstract

Science has almost solved the problem of malaria in all its phases; but, despite our almost complete knowledge of the life-history of the malarial parasite both in man and in the mosquito, despite our familiarity with all the manifestations of the disease, and despite the fact that every physician knows that it is easily prevented and ordinarily yields to treatment, malaria, though decreasing in severity and frequency, continues as one of the most prevalent diseases in many localities of the United States, in some places its mortality rate amounting to 25 per cent. of the total number of deaths.1

According to the statistics obtained from the last census, the number of deaths from malaria in the United States in the year 1900 was 14,909. The following states showed the greatest mortality: Arkansas leading with 1,730; then Texas, with 1,331; Alabama, 1,055; Louisiana, 1,030; Georgia, 1,011; Tennessee, 987; Missouri, 965;

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