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December 3, 1910

BRAIN TUMOR OF PSYCHOMOTOR AREACAUSING JACKSONIAN AND GENERALIZED CONVULSIONS, VISUAL HALLUCINATIONS, SOMATIC DELUSIONS, ASTEREOGNOSIS AND HEMIPLEGIC PARALYSIS. OPERATION. RECOVERY, MENTAL AND PHYSICAL

JAMA. 1910;55(23):1960-1961. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330230018006
Abstract

NEUROLOGIC REPORT BY DR. LANGDON  The case here reported presents no unusual features pertaining to the growth itself, its localization, the operative procedures or the recovery therefrom. In fact, it may fairly be classed as commonplace in those respects. It had been considered worthy of record, however, by reason of its peculiar symptom-complex, combining marked psychic as well as somatic disturbances; the practical absence of those important "general" symptoms; headache, vomiting, vertigo and papilledema; and the small amount of functional defect remaining at this date (March 16, 1910) four months after operation.

History.—  Nov. 5, 1909, Dr. R. B. Hannah,1 of Georgetown, Ohio, asked me to see a woman who had been developing some mental symptoms for a few weeks. It was also stated that preceding these evidences of insanity there had been some convulsive attacks, local and general. The development of the abnormal mental state, however, appeared to

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