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Article
December 31, 1910

A SIMPLE APPARATUS FOR ACCURATELY FIXING BLOOD-SLIDES BY HEAT

Author Affiliations

ROANOKE, VA.

JAMA. 1910;55(27):2299. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330270021013

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Abstract

In fixing blood-slides by heat, one finds that the results of the copperplate method are so inconstant that it is difficult to get a good specimen unless one keeps in constant practice. There is no way of determining the exact amount of heat used or of keeping the heat regular. I have devised the following simple apparatus for office and laboratory use:

As shown in the illustration, an ordinary laboratory standard supports an iron dish, C, resting on an asbestos plate, under which is a gas burner. This iron dish is easily made by screwing a two-inch nipple into a pipe cap. This dish is filled with petrolatum, into which is sunk a small, thin copper cup so that the end sticks out as shown at B. This cup is just large enough to admit with ease the glass slide. In the petrolatum is sunk the bulb of a thermometer, A.

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