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Article
January 18, 1913

QUARANTINE IN THE MARITIME CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES: BY THE PUBLIC HEALTH, HOSPITAL AND BUDGET COMMITTEE OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE

JAMA. 1913;60(3):194-200. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340030024013
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  With the recurring appearance of cholera on the Continent of Europe and of the bubonic plague in Central America and Cuba, the matter of the quarantine again demands discussion and careful consideration. The Journal of the American Medical Association of July 27, 1912, devotes to it an editorial1 which affirms that the plague on the eastern coast of the United States is already a national health problem, while Dr. Howard D. King2 of New Orleans, in a long article in the same issue of The Journal, asserts that "the United States to-day is confronted with a problem of momentous import, and one whose very gravity should awaken the entire country... to the danger of plague invasion."The sounding of these warnings will probably cause the several health boards concerned to undertake precautionary measures. It is also arousing an agitation among the general public. The time is therefore

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