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Article
March 1, 1913

THE CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT OF SALPINGITIS BY UTERINE AND TUBAL INJECTION

Author Affiliations

Surgeon, Columbia Hospital for Women WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1913;60(9):656-657. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340090018007
Abstract

In the light of experience we are enabled to practice more conservative and less radical or sacrificial surgery when treating infectious disease of the pelvic organs of women. Many of our gynecologic patients come to us after the acute symptoms of salpingitis have subsided, and every one knows that operations are comparatively safe at this time. This alone indicates the wisdom of conservative treatment of some kind. The almost universal success now attained in the surgical treatment of salpingitis by competent operators leaves little to be desired unless we appreciate the fact that patients are not always well afterward, even if their lives are not in danger. Of this part of the subject the last word has not been said. We have therefore ventured in many instances during the past two decades to attempt the complete sterilization of the uterine and tubal mucosa, and to leave at least one tube

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