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Article
March 22, 1913

A NEW ETHER-VAPORIZER: A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE TECHNIC OF INTRAPHARYNGEAL INSUFFLATION ANESTHESIA

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University; Assistant Surgeon, Roosevelt Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1913;60(12):892-894. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340120018007
Abstract

The vaporizer (Fig. 1) herein described was devised to supply certain deficiencies in preexisting types of vaporizers for insufflation anesthesia. These deficiencies are inaccurate knowledge of the amount of air passing and of the percentage of ether vaporized. The present vaporizer indicates at all times the amount of air passing and makes possible the mathematical control of the ether percentage. Only by such knowledge can control and accuracy of dosage be secured and the effect of a given dose be foretold. Otherwise the patient must be used as the primary index of the amount of ether being delivered.

The essential feature of this apparatus is a device whereby the total air delivered is at all times indicated. It consists of an inverted aluminum cup (1, Fig. 2) riding in a glass tube (2, Fig. 2) on a central rod (3, Fig. 2). This rides at increasing heights as the air-stream,

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