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Article
March 29, 1913

GUNSHOT WOUNDS OF THE ABDOMEN

Author Affiliations

Surgeon, St. Vincent's Hospital LEADVILLE, COLO.

JAMA. 1913;60(13):955-957. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340130003002
Abstract

The greater relative frequency of gunshot wounds of the abdomen in civil practice than in military practice is explicable by the closer range, and by the more accurate aim of the assailant in civil life. Younge1 reports 1,053 rifle-ball wounds occurring in the Boer War, of which 92 (9 per cent.) were of the head, 85 (8 per cent.) of the chest and 66 (6 per cent.) of the abdomen. My own experience, limited to civil practice, consists of 41 cases, of which 13 (31 per cent.) were of the head, 8 (19 per cent.) of the chest and 13 (31 per cent.) of the abdomen.

The wound of entry is usually to be found in the anterior or lateral aspect of the abdomen, though the bullet may enter from the back, and not infrequently bullet wounds of the chest also penetrate the abdomen. Two patients in this series

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