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Article
March 29, 1913

THE GROWTH, THE DEATH AND THE REGENERATION OF BONE

JAMA. 1913;60(13):983-990. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340130031014
Abstract

Radical differences of opinion have always characterized the teaching of the theory of the growth and regeneration of bone, but one factor in the process appears to have been unanimously conceded a place of great importance. The embryologists, the anatomists, the physiologists, the surgeons and the pathologists have agreed that the periosteum is not only a source of nutrition for the bone but that it also possesses definite osteogenic properties: that from the periosteum the osteoblasts have their origin, in part at least, for the formation of the bones of the fetus, and that the process for the regeneration of bone to replace portions destroyed by disease originates and develops largely in and from the periosteum.

In a recent article1 one of the foremost American surgical anatomists of to-day says:

In thE new-born, and in young individual, the periosteum is composed of three layers, the outer layer consisting mainly

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