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Article
April 12, 1913

INDUCED VARIATIONS IN THE AGGLUTIN-ABILITY OF BACILLUS TYPHOSUS

Author Affiliations

BERKELEY, CAL.

From the Hearst Laboratory of Pathology and Bacteriology, University of California.

JAMA. 1913;60(15):1141. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340150023006
Abstract

It is well recognized that strains of the typhoid bacillus vary in the readiness with which they are clumped by a typhoid patient's serum, or even by a typhoid immune serum. These variations in agglutinability are so marked in freshly isolated strains of the microorganism that not infrequently it is impossible to identify them as true typhoid bacilli even by the use of potent immune serums until they have been grown for several generations on culture mediums. This failure in immediate identification at best delays diagnosis and has at times led to error.1 The following observations made in connection with an extended study on the comparative immunizing value of various preparations of the typhoid bacillus offer some explanation of the inagglutinability of freshly isolated cultures, and suggest a possible means of avoiding it.

As a means of testing the efficacy of various methods of immunization, we have made use

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