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Article
April 19, 1913

INSTRUCTION IN HYGIENE IN MEDICAL COLLEGES AND THE TRAINING OF HEALTH OFFICERS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology and Dean, College of Medicine and Surgey, University of Minnesota; President-Elect, University of British Columbia MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1913;60(16):1199-1204. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340160001001
Abstract

In America we have been slow to recognize the need of special training for the various branches of public service. Many examples lie close at hand. We are proud to show visitors that our most imposing and best buildings are for the training of our children, those who are to carry on the work after we have laid it down. Yet we entrust the training of our girls and boys to those who are school-teachers pro tempore and whose ultimate graduation at the altar, at the bar, in the profession of medicine or in business, being constantly in mind, is apt to lower pedagogic efficiency. Corporation lawyers often use the bench as a postgraduate training. The interests of the corporations demand and receive the services of the best and most highly paid talent, while, on the other hand, the interests of the public are too often left to the individual

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