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Article
April 19, 1913

THE TREATMENT OF AMEBIC DYSENTERY WITH SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTIONS OF EMETINE HYDROCHLORID: REPORT OF SIX CASES

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Clinical Medicine, Tulane University NEW ORLEANS

JAMA. 1913;60(16):1216-1220. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340160018008
Abstract

A new treatment of amebic dysentery is of particular importance to physicians in the Gulf states because of the frequency with which the disease is met in practice. It was therefore with much interest that I read the reports of the treatment of amebic dysentery with soluble salts of emetine by Dr. Leonard Rogers of India. My clinical experience with ipecac in amebic disease, while limited to thirty cases, led me to look on this drug as practically specific when administered in sufficiently large doses (60 to 100 grains daily).

In 1911 I made some experiments,1 at the suggestion of Dr. George Dock, to test the specificity of ipecac on amebas in vitro. These experiments failed to demonstrate any specific action, probably because the ipecac used, as I later discovered, was much below the pharmacopeial standard in total alkaloids (emetine, etc.). Still another cause of failure was the employment

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