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Article
May 3, 1913

A NEW METHOD OF TREATING NEURALGIA OF THE TRIGEMINUS BY THE INJECTION OF ALCOHOL INTO THE GASSERIAN GANGLION

Author Affiliations

Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Chicago Postgraduate Medical School; Assistant Professor of Clinicl Neurology, Northwestern University Medical School; Attending Neurologist, Cook County Hospital CHICAGO

JAMA. 1913;60(18):1354-1357. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340180016007
Abstract

The greatest advance in the treatment of trifacial neuralgia was made when Schlösser, a Munich ophthalmologist, announced his method of injecting alcohol into the branches of the trigeminus nerve at their exit from the cranium. Ostwalt in Europe, and Kiliani and Hauck in America somewhat later adopted what was practically the same method with slight modifications. As the technic was extremely difficult, only the chosen few who had learned it directly of the master, after serving with him a more or less prolonged apprenticeship, were in a position to utilize it in their practice. It was not, therefore, until Lévy and Baudouin of Paris had discovered a comparatively easy technic that the alcohol-injection treatment of trifacial neuralgia had become a distinct addition to the physician's therapeutic armamentarium.

Though this has become the generally accepted method of treating true trifacial neuralgia, there are cases in which the benefits of the method

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