[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 17, 1913

LONGITUDINAL FISSURED FRACTURE OF THE LOWER END OF THE RADIUS

Author Affiliations

Albany, N. Y.

JAMA. 1913;60(20):1537-1538. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340200027016
Abstract

Instructor in Surgery, Albany Medical College; Attending Dispensary Surgeon, Albany Hospital; Assistant Attending Surgeon, South End Dispensary

Few examples of longitudinal, or fissured, fracture of the lower end of the radius are on record. Cotton1 speaks of only three specimens as constituting the entire evidence. Stimson,2 who refers to the lesion as an incomplete Colles' fracture, has seen only one skiagram of the condition.

The condition was first described by Bigelow,3 and although there are sundry references in the literature, published radiographic findings seem to be limited to Parrish's recent article.4

The latter, so far as I know, is the only published report (except this one) with roentgenographic illustration of the lesion.

REPORT OF CASE  W. R., aged 31, truck-driver, Sept. 19, 1912, fell from the seat of his truck, striking his right wrist against the pavement. At the time of the accident he paid but

×