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May 31, 1913

WHOOPING-COUGH: A PLEA FOR MORE EFFICIENT PUBLIC REGULATIONS RELATIVE TO THE CONTROL OF THIS MOST SERIOUS AND FATAL DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School; Associate Visiting Physician at the children's Hospital and at The Infants' Hospital, Boston BOSTON

JAMA. 1913;60(22):1677-1680. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340220001001
Abstract

According to the mortality statistics compiled by the United States Census Bureau in 1906, from a registration area comprising slightly less than one-half of the population of the United States, there were 6,324 deaths from whooping-cough in that area in children under 5 years of age. The United States Public Health Reports show that in 1910 the death rate per hundred thousand was as follows: whooping-cough, 11.4 per cent.; scarlet fever, 11.6 per cent.; measles, 12.3 per cent., and diphtheria, 21.4 per cent.

In order to get some more recent statistics, I wrote to all the state boards of health, asking for the number of deaths from whooping-cough, scarlet fever and diphtheria during the year 1911, and also for those from bronchitis and bronchopneumonia in children under 5 years of age, I also asked for information as to the state regulations regarding notification,quarantine, disinfection and school attendance in relation to

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