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Article
May 31, 1913

A COMPARISON BETWEEN ZOSTER OF THE FACE AND THAT OF THE LEG: AS SHOWN IN TWO CASES RECENTLY OBSERVED

JAMA. 1913;60(22):1692-1694. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340220016005

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Abstract

The anatomic basis of zoster is an inflammation of the ganglion on the sensory root of a cranial or spinal nerve. This ganglionitis gives rise to trophic disturbances in the emerging or efferent nerve that cause the characteristic, grouped vesicular eruption. As for the cause of the ganglionitis, in the vast majority of instances it undoubtedly is a micro-organism, hut this point need not be dwelt on here, except so far as it helps in the elucidation of the present comparison.

The symptoms common to zoster in any situation are:

  1. The almost constant occurrence of neuralgia of the nerve, the cutaneous distribution of which is about to be the seat of the eruption. This neuralgia may precede the eruption, sometimes by a eonsiderable time,

  1. or it may be coincident with the cutaneous outbreak. Sometimes this symptom is entirely absent.

  2. A characteristic vesicular eruption, otten grouped, and often plainly showing, by

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