[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 7, 1913

EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNITY IN RELATION TO THE AGGLUTINATION REACTION IN TYPHOID

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From Kansas University and the Memorial Institute for Infectious Diseases. Chicago.

JAMA. 1913;60(23):1764-1765. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340230010004
Abstract

The prevention of typhoid fever by injecting killed typhoid bacilli into the body is a comparatively recent procedure which is rapidly becoming general. The question naturally arises, How long will the immunity thus produced persist after treatment? It is impracticable to determine this by direct experimentation on the immunized patient, but it is known that acquired immunity is associated with the presence of antibodies in the blood, and the persistence of these may be taken as an approximate index to the persistence of the immunity.

In November, 1910, a number of students at Kansas University were availing themselves of the antityphoid inoculation offered by the university authorities, and it occurred to me as an opportunity to follow the effect of this treatment on the agglutinins of the serum. Accordingly a sample of blood was taken from each of a number of students previously to the first injection and the serum

×