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Article
June 14, 1913

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF OCULAR FINDINGS IN ESTIMATING LONGEVITY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1913;60(24):1867-1869. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340240027011
Abstract

Since many of the graver morbid processes of the body are attended at some time or other in their course with changes within the eye, it seems extraordinary that life-insurance examiners do not avail themselves oftener of the aid which ophthalmic science offers them.

There is scarcely an organic disease of the nervous system without ocular complications and the earliest signs of circulatory disturbance can frequently be unmasked by the ophthalmoscope. The proper recognition of the initial pupillary changes in tabes and paresis and of a commencing sclerosis of the retinal vessels in Bright's disease might often serve to warn the examiner and to recommend the rejection of an applicant for insurance who manifested no other signs of ill health.

It would be beyond the scope of this paper to attempt an epitome of the ocular symptoms to which disease of the general system may give rise, so I will

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